HyperVIEW Platform
Lumitron Technologies, Inc. 4th generation laser-compton interaction hardware upon which Lumitron Technology’s HyperVIEW x-ray system is built. The laser technology used in this system is based upon the 2018 Nobel Prize winning achievement in Physics that enables the creation of high-energy, short-duration laser pulses. Such pulses are central to HyperVIEW’s precision interaction and patented methods for compact, efficient, mono-energetic x-ray generation. (Medical Device News Magazine)

At an exclusive event held at University of California, Irvine (UCI) Applied Innovation Center, Lumitron Technologies, Inc. celebrated its arrival in the university’s prestigious Research Park and introduced the gathered luminaries to the HyperVIEW system. Lumitron’s laser-based, X-ray technology will boast imaging capabilities far beyond current medical standards to reach Superman® resolutions and have the unique ability to produce single color X-rays that enable cellular-level identification and treatment of disease.

The HyperVIEW platform utilizes a proprietary X-ray technology conceived and developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Professor Chris Barty of UCI, former CTO of LLNL’s National Ignition Facility and Photon Science Directorate, home of the world’s largest laser system, has overseen the establishment of Lumitron’s commercial endeavor in Irvine, CA and is now shepherding the company’s development of the patents he helped create. Lumitron holds exclusive commercial development rights.

According to Prof. Barty, the HyperVIEW technology presents the potential to create the first true theranostics machine capable of both unprecedented imaging detail and cellular level treatment, simultaneously. The implications for medical applications in particular are astounding.

“As part of its mission, LLNL develops transformational technologies that can be transferred to industry for the public benefit,” said Richard Rankin, director, LLNL Innovation and Partnerships Office. “This represents a major step forward in achieving that objective.”

The HyperVIEW system, is the first major leap forward in imaging capabilities since X-rays were discovered in the late 1800s. Referring to the platform’s potential to selectively locate and treat disease without patient movement, world renowned uro-oncologist, Professor Phil Stricker, Chairman Department Urology St Vincent’s Sydney & Director of The Australian Prostate Cancer Research Center – NSW commented that the Lumitron’s platform would “…have the potential to change everything. With it, we have the potential to image and treat cancer precisely and non-invasively. It could eliminate surgery.”

Lumitron has now established its global R&D and manufacturing facility within the industrial research park of the University of California, Irvine, home of the world-renowned Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic. Establishment of the company’s headquarters in Irvine will provide Lumitron, and its university research partners, the opportunity to work collaboratively going forward.

“We see this as a pivotal moment in imaging,” said Dr. Bruce Tromberg, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery, and Director of the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, co-located on the UCI campus. “As this technology becomes a reality, our teams are excited to work alongside Professor Barty and Lumitron to explore the implementation possibilities. There is little doubt that this represents a new frontier for medicine.”

The collaborative nature of the UCI Applied Innovations initiative was a key factor in the location selection. The university’s commitment to entrepreneurial endeavors and nurturing new technologies has enabled Lumitron to locate its facility among leaders in technology and applied sciences.

”We are excited about the potential of this technology,” said Pramod P. Khargonekar, Vice Chancellor for Research, University of California, Irvine. “This is what is so exciting about the growth in UCI research: our ability to attract top tier innovators and very quickly commercialize technologies, going from breakthrough research to practical application in the marketplace.” Khargonekar went on to note that UCI students will also benefit from Lumitron’s establishment at UCI explaining that Professor Barty’s arrival includes development of an applied innovations lab on campus.

Lumitron is already looking beyond the medical applications of its technology. The HyperVIEW system holds many industrial implications. The powerful platform’s imaging and elemental-analysis capabilities are already being contemplated for use in a variety of industries that have long struggled with next-gen imaging needs such as homeland security and 3D manufacturing.

“This new, accessible science will commercially enable breakthrough applications beyond medicine and has applicability to non-destructive materials evaluation, 3D printing, mining, waste management and security,” said Mr. Maurie Stang, founder of Lumitron. Stang continued, “…Lumitron’s initial focus will be to market its HyperVIEW systems to leading international research institutes and university hospitals to support the development of new applications as well as harness the capability and innovation of many leading institutions in their respective fields throughout the world.”

The HyperVIEW platform leverages three complete generations of machine design, construction and test at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and more than USD$220 million of R&D in advanced X-ray, laser and accelerator science undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy.