Florida / New York / No Carolina
Ph: 561.316.3330

Economic Study Shows Significant Cost Savings when Using Venock Device for Large Bore Venous Access Site Closure

About Medical Device News Magazine

About Medical Device News Magazine. We are a digital publication founded in 2008 located in the United States.

Advertise with Medical Device News Magazine! Join Our #1 Family of Advertisers!

We pride ourselves on being the best-kept secret when it comes to distributing your news! Our unique digital approach enables us to circulate your...

Summation

  •   Subsequently, the patient is then bedridden with a tight compression bandage (or even a sandbag) over the groin area and remains in this state for 6 to 8 hours, requiring a bladder catheter and pain medication.
  • Venock has conducted a comprehensive economic evaluation study (link to White Paper below) which demonstrates that using the Venock closure device, which can save well over 30 minutes per patient in the Cathlab, will result in cost savings of over $1,716 per procedure.
  • The Venock large bore venous closure device, shown in Figure 2, is the first and only device that will singularly close large bore (>8 mm, 24 Fr) access sites in the femoral vein following a transcatheter procedure.

Primarily because of patient safety, structural heart therapies have been trending more towards transcatheter venous access.  Additionally, with associated therapeutic devices becoming increasingly complex (i.e. collapsible and deployable structures), the venous access sites necessary to pass these devices are getting larger.  Some are up to and well beyond 30 Fr (10 mm).  Such large bore venous access sites (e.g. for the Leadless Pacemaker) are becoming increasingly prevalent in cathlabs in the US and EU.

Post therapy, these venous sites are typically closed using manual compression.  This process begins with an individual physically pressing the access site to attain initial blood stoppage, as shown in Figure 1.  For large bore sites, the process can take 30 and even up to 60 minutes.  Subsequently, the patient is then bedridden with a tight compression bandage (or even a sandbag) over the groin area and remains in this state for 6 to 8 hours, requiring a bladder catheter and pain medication.

This process needlessly consumes hospital personnel time, takes up hospital beds, dramatically slows down discharge, and is incredibly burdensome for the patient, typically leaving them with massive hematoma and an increased risk for blood clots.  Furthermore, because of the time taken to recover from closure, the number of therapies performed per day in the cathlab is significantly reduced, requiring patients to wait longer for their procedures.

The Venock large bore venous closure device, shown in Figure 2, is the first and only device that will singularly close large bore (>8 mm, 24 Fr) access sites in the femoral vein following a transcatheter procedure. This device provides significant time savings by attaining full closure in just one minute, removing the need for the 6 to 8 hours of bedrest, and allowing for near immediate patient ambulation which will result in significantly faster discharge.

Economic evaluation study shows enormous potential

Venock has conducted a comprehensive economic evaluation study (link to White Paper below) which demonstrates that using the Venock closure device, which can save well over 30 minutes per patient in the Cathlab, will result in cost savings of over $1,716 per procedure. In a mid-sized clinic with 2,000 patients per year this can translate to more than $3.4 million savings annually.

Additionally, reduced procedure and recovery time will increase same-day discharge, potentially saving $6,290 per patient. The economic study shows that reduction of just one day of hospital stay per case can improve the cathlab average margin from -1% to 6%, driving cathlab profitability.

Overall, the Venock device will allow for more efficient Cathlab capacity utilization and higher patient turnover, while drastically saving time and cost during recovery.

Medical Device News Magazinehttps://infomeddnews.com
Medical Device News Magazine provides breaking medical device / biotechnology news. Our subscribers include medical specialists, device industry executives, investors, and other allied health professionals, as well as patients who are interested in researching various medical devices. We hope you find value in our easy-to-read publication and its overall objectives! Medical Device News Magazine is a division of PTM Healthcare Marketing, Inc. Pauline T. Mayer is the managing editor.

Other News

Updated Phase 2 CAPTIVATE Study Results

“After more than five years, the CAPTIVATE study findings confirm the sustained benefit of the fixed duration combination of ibrutinib and venetoclax as a first-line treatment for patients living with CLL, including in those with higher risk genomic features,” said Paolo Ghia MD, Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele and IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, study investigator.‡ “This all-oral, chemotherapy-free, fixed-duration regimen offers eligible patients the advantage of an extended, treatment-free interval while effectively keeping their disease under control.”

Pfizer Reports | ELREXFIO ™ Shows Median Overall Survival of More Than Two Years in People with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

“These compelling overall survival data support the clinical benefit ELREXFIO has already demonstrated and its potential to be a transformative treatment option for people with multiple myeloma,” said Roger Dansey, M.D., Chief Development Officer, Oncology, Pfizer. “The latest results from MagnetisMM-3 reinforce the very promising efficacy observed with ELREXFIO in a relapsed or refractory setting, with deep and durable responses and although definitive conclusions cannot be drawn across studies, the longest reported median progression-free survival among B-cell maturation antigen bispecific antibodies.”

Editas Medicine Reports New Safety and Efficacy Data from the RUBY Trial of Reni-cel in 18 Patients with Sickle Cell Disease | Presented at the European Hematology Association (EHA) Annual Congress

“These data confirm the observations from our prior clinical readouts and further support our belief that reni-cel has the potential to be a best-in-class and clinically differentiated, one-time, durable medicine that can provide life-changing clinical benefits to patients,” said Baisong Mei, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical Officer, Editas Medicine.

By using this website you agree to accept Medical Device News Magazine Privacy Policy